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Borrowed Kachinas


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Borrowed Katsinas

pahi ala 3 hornBorrowed kachinas are those spirit beings whose origins are from the Zûni's, the Hopi's nearest pueblo neighbors, or of unknown origins and which have been adopted or incorporated into the Hopi kachina culture.

These adopted spirits are valued because they bring rain or other special powers to the kachina spiritual reserve.

Many of these borrowed characters are passed from group to group and have stories intertwined with religious or historic folklore. Many of these borrowed kachinas have changed in appearance and meaning over time to more closely resemble other Hopi kachinas.

Borrowed Kachina Masks

Print and trace the designs onto multi-color fun craft foam sheets to create pliable and colorful soft face masks. Use left over trimmings of foam pieces to cut and paste intricate designs and shapes onto the mask.

The Construct-A-Mask versions are presented in undecorated, basic format so children can create their own unique decorations. For best results print on heavy duty vellum paper or card stock. All paper mask designs are printable on regular or heavy duty 8 1/2" x 11" paper. Print landscape mode for larger masks, portrait setting for smaller masks.

korosto harvestThe Koroasta, Harvest or Corn Planter 's most distinctive feature is a three-prong white beak. This kachina is very popular since he is responsible for influencing the growth of corn. He travels to villages with a planting stick and seeds to bring rainfall and growth to plants and flowers.





soyok whuti ogreThe So'yoko (Soyok' Wuhti) or Ogre Woman is believed to have come from the Awatovi Ruins in Navajo County, Arizona, a pueblo destroyed in the late 1700's. This kachina also belongs in the Chief or Mongwi Kachinum category.

She appears during the main Powamu ceremony when children are initiated into their right-of-passage to adulthood. Children are purposely frightened by ghastly horror stories of demons, animal-man ogres, half-human witches and more before the initiation.

When the Soyok' Wuhti appears the children become petrified with fright. This beastly kachina carries a blood-smeared saw, knife or cleaver in one hand, a scary crook in the other hand and threatens to eat naughty little children. She often reaches out with her crook to grab unwary villagers or children and whenever she catches children she places them in her basket and holds them for ransom.

She is fearsome in appearance, dressed in black with long straggly hair, buggy eyes and a large fanged mouth. She performs with Soyok'Taka or Ogre Man, another fearsome monster ogre, who stands by her side and stomps his feet and growls. Her cry is a shrill falsetto that sounds like "Soyoko-u-u-u"!


awatovi soyok taqaThe Awatovi or Awatovi Soyok'Taka or Ogre Man is believed to have come from the Awatovi Ruins in Navajo County, Arizona, a pueblo destroyed in the late 1700's.

He appears during the main Powamu ceremony when children are initiated into their right-of-passage to adulthood. Children are purposely frightened by ghastly horror stories of demons, animal-man ogres, half-human witches and more before the initiation.

When the Soyok'Taka appears the children become petrified with fright. This beastly kachina performs with the Soyok' Wuhti or Ogre Woman. While she goes about threatening to eat naughty children, he stands by her side and stomps his feet and growls.

Saiyatasha, Zuni's one-horn kachina, is the rain priest of the North. He has one horn on one side of its head and a Sunflower Symbol on the other side. He appears during the Shalako ceremony in early December and leads the Hututu rain priest and Yamukakto warriors.

Tasap Yeibichai is the grandfather of the Navajo Kachina. He introduces the dances and entertains villagers by pantomiming exaggorated stories and lively dance steps in comical way.

tasap yeibdhao grand fatherThe appearance of the Tasap Yeibichai can only add to the fun with its corn-stalk nose and corn cob ears as decorations.

The Chakwaina kachina, a wuya of his clan is a warrior kachina who has a number of relatives which include the Grandmother, Mana or Mother and Sister as well as the Uncle, a side dancer. This kachina also belongs in the Chief or Mongwi Kachinum category.

The Chakwaina Sho-adta and Chakwaina Mana Kachina is the Grandmother of the Asa Clan. Most kachina impersonators or dancers are men, even when the kachina spirit is female. This kachina appears in January during the Kiva Dances in the Pamuya ceremonies at First Mesa.

Like the He'e'e kachina the Chakwaina represents a warrior spirit who leads a band of other warrior kachinas to help protect the ceremonies.

This kachina mask bears fertility symbols and is thought to bring about abundant crops of corn. The dancer shakes a rattle to simulate the sound of rain.

Color Book Kachina Masks

  • Turtle Kahaila
  • Koroasta, Harvest or Corn Planter
  • Pahi-ala Three Horn
  • Sai-astasana Hututu Zûni Rain Priest of the North
  • Awatovi Soyok Wuuti
  • Awatovi Soyok Taqa
  • One-Horned Kachina
  • Tasap Yyebitchai Grandfather of the Navajo
  • Chakwaina Grandmother, One who Cries
  • Hemis Kachina
  • Hatko Wood Carrying Katsina